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You know those white dashed lines separating the lanes in a highway? Answer: _____________ Most people I ask say 3 feet. Your perspective is always driving at 60mph, so they look 3 feet long. And that’s the first problem in psychiatry: perspective.Unless you get out of your car and measure those lines, you’ll never accept the truth.Which brings us to the third problem: if you do try and change your perspective, get out and measure those lines, you will be quickly dispatched by a minivan to the face for your lack of faith.In this article, we provide an overview of the factors associated with the ADRs due to psychotropic medication in the elderly, and the ADRs associated with the use of antipsychotics and sedative-hypnotics in the geriatric population.For this, literature searches were conducted through MEDLINE, Pub Med, and Google Scholar using keyword terms: Geriatric, elderly, safety, adverse events, ADRs, antipsychotic, names of individual antipsychotics, benzodiazepine, sedative, hypnotic, zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone.Clozaril not only does not cause EPS, especially Tardive Dyskinesia (TD), it actually can treat TD.

All first-line, oral, second-generation antipsychotics available in the U. Among agents indicated for schizophrenia treatment, lurasidone and cariprazine were found to be predominately activating, while olanzapine, quetiapine (both immediate and extended-release), ziprasidone, asenapine, and iloperidone were predominately sedating.

Psychotropic drugs are commonly used to manage mental and behavioral problems in geriatric patients.

This is, however, accompanied by the risk of developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs), impacting the safety with which the drug can be used.

These adverse effects can be a major obstacle to treatment, therefore knowing the differences in tolerability profiles among these agents may help with selecting optimal therapy.

“Despite the availability of numerous antipsychotics, after appraising patient characteristics at the time of treatment selection, physicians may quickly run out of tolerable treatment options,"the authors concluded.