Dating british patent numbers

This tends to protect the use of these marks, and in general restricts them to use on pieces made in the UK.

This protects both collectors and the companies who registered the marks.

The National Archives has representations for around 2,950,000 designs registered between 18.

Registration was not compulsory, so many designs will not be found in our records.

The information for this page was compiled with the assistance of the British Public Record Office, and the British Designs Registry Office. Their help, and permission to use the data, is certainly appreciated.

During the period 1842-1883 the British Patent Office issued a diamond mark along with the registration number when a design was registered.

More recently, having also acquired responsibility for copyright regulation, the Patent Office has become known as the Intellectual Property Office.

On 1 October 2008, the position of the Company Names Adjudicator was introduced under the Companies Act 2006.

This act consolidated patent scrutiny and awards into a single office serving the whole of the United Kingdom (where previously a petitioner had had to apply and pay fees to several offices, and to obtain separate patents for each of the UK's constituent nations).

An item with a registry mark or number could have been produced before (less likely as the design would not be protected), or after the date of the registry mark.

The number listed for each year in the table is the first number issued that year. If your number is higher, but less than the number for the next year, then your item had it's design registered during that year.

As well as showing that the design had been registered, diamond mark offered the buyer the reassurance of knowing an item was of British design.

It also assured the person registering the design a degree of protection from copying.